Services

Weekly Services
Holy Week

The Episcopal Church uses the Book of Common Prayer to unify and organize worship. However, we welcome and join in prayer with people who have different points of view and encourage open dialog. We share a Christian faith that honors the Bible, the traditions of the Church, and God-given human reason.

For each service, celebration or office, scripture is read grounding the experience in the Bible. The Lectionary Page is the reference for the cycle of readings.

Rite I is the traditional form of the Holy Eucharist, a service with Communion at its core. The language is derived from the sixteenth century (roughly contemporary with Shakespeare), but elegant and clearly understood. The service includes readings from Scripture, preaching, prayers for the church and the world, and Holy Communion. During the service, baptized people are invited to take communion and others may come forward during communion for a blessing.

Rite II is the contemporary form of the Eucharist service, again with Communion at its core. The words of the service and the readings from scripture are in contemporary language. The service includes readings from Scripture, preaching, prayers for the church and the world, and Holy Communion. Baptized Christians are invited to share Communion, others to come forward for a blessing.

Morning Prayer is a Daily Office, a service of psalms, scripture readings and prayers. This use of the word “office” comes from the Latin word “opus,” meaning “work”; the Daily Office is the daily prayer work of the church. Morning Prayer may be led by a lay person or by clergy. There is no communion in this service.

Evening Prayer is a Daily Office, a service of psalms, scripture readings and prayers. This use of the word “office” comes from the Latin word “opus,” meaning “work”; the Daily Office is the daily prayer work of the church. Evening Prayer may be led by a lay person or by clergy. There is no communion in this service.

Healing Prayer is held once a week and focuses on prayer for the healing of body, mind and spirit. It includes the sacrament of anointing and laying on of hands.

Taize (pronounced Tah-zay) is a style of ecumenical service developed in France following World War II to foster spiritual healing and growth among diverse people. This service of simple music, readings, prayer and contemplation is held by candlelight in the chapel. It is a lay-led service and does not include communion. Please view the Taize Community website for more information.

Mass on the Grass is an informal outdoor service followed by a potluck supper held on Wednesdays during the summer months at Trinity Church. This service will include communion if a priest is present.

Weddings and funerals are pastoral offices offered to members of Trinity Episcopal Church and their families. Baptism is a special liturgy (rite) usually, but not always, performed for infants and their families.

The Labyrinth
Our labyrinth is located on the Lewis Street side of the church, between the back of the church and the entrance to the Parish House. It is always available for use. Walking a labyrinth is a tool that can be useful to people of all spiritual traditions. An ancient concept, the Christian community often uses labyrinths as a way to engage in our life in Christ using body, mind and soul.

Questions?
Do you still have questions about our services? Of course you do, they are very complex with layers of tradition, belief and expression. Please go to our Worship FAQ page which explains some of our customs.